1. Home
  2. Discover
  3. Past Exhibitions

Past Exhibitions


Sheep

6 April - 29 June 2019

Between 6 April and 29 June, Ceredigion Museum will display a group of works on loan from Tate for the first time. The pictures, including three Henry Moore drawings, will form part of the museum’s upcoming exhibition Sheep, which will look at the history, heritage and culture of sheep farming communities and their wider relationship with the land and landscape in Wales.

All of the works from Tate feature depictions of sheep, which alongside the Henry Moore drawings include: a Joseph Beuys drawing and a screen-print on paper ‘Sheep B’ by the Israeli artist Menashe Kadishman. Bringing these to the museum will be a real highlight for the public and offers an exciting opportunity to see Welsh artists exhibit their work alongside internationally significant works of art as well as Ceredigion’s own collection. 

To make these loans possible, funding has been provided by the Weston Loan Programme with Art Fund; created by the Garfield Weston Foundation and Art Fund, the Weston Loan Programme is the first ever UK-wide funding scheme to enable smaller and local authority museums to borrow works of art and artefacts from national collections. Further funding has been provided by Arts Council of Wales, The Ferryman Project: Sharing Works of Art which is supported by National Lottery players through the National Lottery Heritage Fund, the John Ellerman Foundation and Art Fund. 

A cross-disciplinary symposium ‘Future Landscapes’, on 9 -10 May, will accompany the exhibition to further the discussions and dialogues inspired by the work featured in the exhibition.  

Contributing artists include Miranda Whall who is working on a series of pieces relating to landscape; the first, called ‘Crossed Paths’ looks at the story of the upland mountains of Wales told from the perspective of a sheep. New work in a variety of media including installation, film and sculpture will be on display by artists Short and Forward, Christine Mills, Morag Colqhuon, Carwyn Evans and photographer Marian Delyth. 

Alongside the exhibition, artist/filmmaker Ffion Jones will be engaging with sheep farmers to make a new piece in collaboration with farming communities with inspiration from the agricultural collection at Ceredigion Museum. The final work will be shown as part of the exhibition. 

Alice Briggs, Assistant Curator at Ceredigion Museum said, ‘The funding for Sheep from the Weston Loan Programme with Art Fund and others will have a lasting legacy beyond just the exhibition. Its support of the necessary upgrades and accompanying programmes will enable the museum to borrow other important artefacts and treasures to display in the future – we already developing more plans to borrow artefacts from the British Museum and National Museum of Wales in 2020; making the culture and heritage of the region more accessible to the people of Ceredigion.” 

Sophia Mason, Trustee of the Garfield Weston Foundation, said, ‘We are so delighted to start the second year of our Weston Loan Programme with an exhibition in Wales. It’s incredible to see how much this programme is empowering museums like Ceredigion as well as ensuring our national treasures can be seen by audiences in the context of their own area and local heritage.” 

Stephen Deuchar, Director of Art Fund, said, “The Weston Loan Programme with Art Fund is about encouraging museums to share their collections with each other and bringing new benefit and opportunity to their visitors. We’re proud to be working with the Garfield Weston Foundation to realise this important national programme.” 

 


Ceredigion Art Society 

Inspired by History - exploring the pre-historic, Celtic, and Roman treasures of Ceredigion 

19 January - 23 March 2019

The County of Ceredigion wraps itself around the centre of Cardigan Bay stretching from Aberdyfi in the north to Abertyfi in the south and inland towards the Cambrian mountains covering some 696 square miles or approximately 1,783 square kilometres and has been inhabited since prehistoric times.
The most obvious signs of habitation by our forebears as we travel today through the area comes in the form of the numerous hillforts and enclosures of the iron age, giving distinctive form to the hills. In particular, Aberystwyth’s own impressive hillfort of Pen Dinas dominates the skyline above the town. More recently the Roman Villa discovered at Abermagwr has yielded valuable information about the Roman occupation of the area.
Besides evidence of man’s occupation of the area there are also other treasures such as fossils of long dead sea creatures and the fascinating submerged forest at Borth.
Our members have attempted to bring to life some of these treasures and whether it be the exquisite Tynddol sun disc and the mysterious Penbryn ritual spoons from Castell Nadolig or the photographic reality of the submerged forest at Borth, the abstract textile depicting the Romans search for gold or the imagined way of life in the hillforts, together with artefacts from the Museums own collections we hope you enjoy this peep into the past.

 


Margaret Jones: Celebrating 100

27 October 2018 - 5 January 2019

Ceredigion Museum celebrates the 100th birthday of award winning Ceredigion illustrator Margaret Jones with an exclusive exhibition.

The exhibition Margaret Jones: Celebrating 100, highlighting the career of award winning illustrator Margaret Jones on the eve of her 100th birthday, includes early sketches and unseen drawings owned by the Jones family themselves. The exclusive exhibition opens the door to this famous painter’s art, inviting visitors to discover the ideas, sketches and inner workings of her iconic paintings and illustrations.

The exhibition will feature previously unseen original prints from the ‘Arthur’ series and rare prints from unpublished work including ‘Seven days of the week’, which looks at how the names of the days of the week derive from the sagas of the Nordic Kings and Queens. Archive photo albums and unpublished books will be shown alongside the drawings and prints giving an intimate view of the artist and her life.

Ceredigion Museum’s assistant curator Alice Briggs said, “It has been wonderful to have the chance to delve through the portfolios of Margaret Jones, to discover more about her process of creating her illustrations and to learn more of her own detailed knowledge of the storytelling traditions in which she has illustrated.”

Becoming a professional painter at the age of 60, Margaret became known as one of the leading illustrators in the Celtic tradition and other folklore. Born in England, Margaret brought up her own young family in India with her husband, before is appointment as lecturer in Education Studies at the University College of Wales, Aberystwyth.  Here, her portrayal of the Mabinogi has defined the way a generation of children in Wales imagine the folklore of the nation’s past.

Professor Sioned Davies, the former Head of Welsh at Cardiff University, whose ongoing contribution to Welsh language and culture is highly influential, will open the exhibition on Saturday 27 October at 2pm. All museum visitors are very welcome to attend the official opening.